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 “The more the mind is used, the more flexible it becomes, and the more it takes upon itself new interests.” It became relevant to me when I visited Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses” at Dia Beacon this past summer. The sculptures embody the relationship of time, space, and movement, in which space is shifting, portraying movement in unpredictable ways, challenging vision and memory, in order to spark interests and new perspectives. It is the idea of the individual body passing through space and it’s movement not being predicted by sight, but by physical awareness in relation to space, place, time and movement. Because torqued ellipses are never align, but instead, angle one to the other, they are able to produce unprecedented spatial experiences. In the beginning, I saw these sculptures as just objects, unaware with the amount of space, movement, and time embodied by them. By interacting, walking and participating with the sculptures, I realized I was being challenged by the space and movement constructed, and stimulated my gradually adaptation to new ideas and flexible perspectives. I concluded my experience with the “Torqued Ellipses” in 5 steps, which inspire the names of my accessory products:     1) Inquisition: when experiencing the shifting of space and movement in unpredictable ways  2)Exploration: the moment of relating movement to material and space  3)Contortion: studying the shape and form, where a strategic sequence defines its’ space and movement  4)Perception: becoming aware of the change in your vision & mind, making room for new ideas and flexible perspectives  5) Conversion: the relationship of crossing and exchange being accepted and converted     Colors are inspired by various browns of rust, dark brown, cognac and oxblood found in Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses”. Silhouettes mimic the voluminous shapes and arcs of the sculptures, that create spacing between the individual and the object and show the flow of movement. Molding Veg-tan leathers and layering soft German cow leather into spherical shapes will juxtapose the idea of using soft materials to mimic voluminous metal curves that demonstrate movement and space, constructing plane in relation to plane. Distressed-like Vintage leather of cognac and oxblood mimic the texture and rusting of the sculpture’s steel material. A few dark oxblood and navy blues are inspired by areas on the sculpture where the sun hits. By incorporating strategic sequences similar to that in Serra’s ellipses, Donald Judd’s “Untitled 1970” sculpture from Dia Beacon also inspired the silhouettes of my shoe soles.
       
     
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CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-4.jpg
       
     
 “The more the mind is used, the more flexible it becomes, and the more it takes upon itself new interests.” It became relevant to me when I visited Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses” at Dia Beacon this past summer. The sculptures embody the relationship of time, space, and movement, in which space is shifting, portraying movement in unpredictable ways, challenging vision and memory, in order to spark interests and new perspectives. It is the idea of the individual body passing through space and it’s movement not being predicted by sight, but by physical awareness in relation to space, place, time and movement. Because torqued ellipses are never align, but instead, angle one to the other, they are able to produce unprecedented spatial experiences. In the beginning, I saw these sculptures as just objects, unaware with the amount of space, movement, and time embodied by them. By interacting, walking and participating with the sculptures, I realized I was being challenged by the space and movement constructed, and stimulated my gradually adaptation to new ideas and flexible perspectives. I concluded my experience with the “Torqued Ellipses” in 5 steps, which inspire the names of my accessory products:     1) Inquisition: when experiencing the shifting of space and movement in unpredictable ways  2)Exploration: the moment of relating movement to material and space  3)Contortion: studying the shape and form, where a strategic sequence defines its’ space and movement  4)Perception: becoming aware of the change in your vision & mind, making room for new ideas and flexible perspectives  5) Conversion: the relationship of crossing and exchange being accepted and converted     Colors are inspired by various browns of rust, dark brown, cognac and oxblood found in Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses”. Silhouettes mimic the voluminous shapes and arcs of the sculptures, that create spacing between the individual and the object and show the flow of movement. Molding Veg-tan leathers and layering soft German cow leather into spherical shapes will juxtapose the idea of using soft materials to mimic voluminous metal curves that demonstrate movement and space, constructing plane in relation to plane. Distressed-like Vintage leather of cognac and oxblood mimic the texture and rusting of the sculpture’s steel material. A few dark oxblood and navy blues are inspired by areas on the sculpture where the sun hits. By incorporating strategic sequences similar to that in Serra’s ellipses, Donald Judd’s “Untitled 1970” sculpture from Dia Beacon also inspired the silhouettes of my shoe soles.
       
     

“The more the mind is used, the more flexible it becomes, and the more it takes upon itself new interests.” It became relevant to me when I visited Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses” at Dia Beacon this past summer. The sculptures embody the relationship of time, space, and movement, in which space is shifting, portraying movement in unpredictable ways, challenging vision and memory, in order to spark interests and new perspectives. It is the idea of the individual body passing through space and it’s movement not being predicted by sight, but by physical awareness in relation to space, place, time and movement. Because torqued ellipses are never align, but instead, angle one to the other, they are able to produce unprecedented spatial experiences. In the beginning, I saw these sculptures as just objects, unaware with the amount of space, movement, and time embodied by them. By interacting, walking and participating with the sculptures, I realized I was being challenged by the space and movement constructed, and stimulated my gradually adaptation to new ideas and flexible perspectives. I concluded my experience with the “Torqued Ellipses” in 5 steps, which inspire the names of my accessory products:

 

1) Inquisition: when experiencing the shifting of space and movement in unpredictable ways

2)Exploration: the moment of relating movement to material and space

3)Contortion: studying the shape and form, where a strategic sequence defines its’ space and movement

4)Perception: becoming aware of the change in your vision & mind, making room for new ideas and flexible perspectives

5) Conversion: the relationship of crossing and exchange being accepted and converted

 

Colors are inspired by various browns of rust, dark brown, cognac and oxblood found in Richard Serra’s “Torqued Ellipses”. Silhouettes mimic the voluminous shapes and arcs of the sculptures, that create spacing between the individual and the object and show the flow of movement. Molding Veg-tan leathers and layering soft German cow leather into spherical shapes will juxtapose the idea of using soft materials to mimic voluminous metal curves that demonstrate movement and space, constructing plane in relation to plane. Distressed-like Vintage leather of cognac and oxblood mimic the texture and rusting of the sculpture’s steel material. A few dark oxblood and navy blues are inspired by areas on the sculpture where the sun hits. By incorporating strategic sequences similar to that in Serra’s ellipses, Donald Judd’s “Untitled 1970” sculpture from Dia Beacon also inspired the silhouettes of my shoe soles.

CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-6.jpg
       
     
CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-7.jpg
       
     
CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-8.jpg
       
     
CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-9.jpg
       
     
CFu_Fall2015_SHOEPOLY-11.jpg
       
     
shoe line sheet-1.jpg